Irish Red Cross helping relieve demand on health service
Due to pent up demand, the Irish Red Cross is now doing key calls at the request of the National Ambulance Service. At lunchtime today, the National Ambulance Service requested the Irish Red Cross to do AS2 calls which typically involve moving patients from high acute beds to low acute beds to free up high acute bed for patients in more urgent need.

The Irish Red Cross responded to call-outs across the country yesterday, in Cork, Kerry, Tipperary, Wexford, Waterford, Louth, South County Dublin, Laois, Kildare and Limerick. Altogether, Irish Red Cross volunteers attended a recording-breaking 60 call-outs in the southern region. The Irish Red Cross has never dealt with this volume of calls - not alone in one region - but nationwide - in one day before. 41 of these calls were in Cork. These call-outs included dialysis transports, transports of advanced paramedics to situations of urgent need and transport of nursing and healthcare workers.

Transfer of Medications
The Irish Red Cross has also been asked today to transfer medications to University Hospital Waterford from the Mercy University Hospital Cork and South Infirmary Victoria University Hospital Cork.

Overnight
The Irish Red Cross expects to assist advanced paramedics on essential calls overnight using its 4x4 ambulances. If there is a call to an area experiencing severe depths of snow and which is inaccessible to normal road ambulances, the Defence Forces, the Irish Red Cross and other voluntary emergency services will be called upon to assist and will bring advanced paramedics to the area of need.

AS2 calls
The Irish Red Cross is currently engaged in AS2 calls primarily in Louth and Dublin city. In Dublin, the Irish Red Cross is doing AS2 hospital discharges from Dublin city hospitals to other hospitals in the capital and is also doing discharges from hospitals in Dublin to hospitals in Louth. The Irish Red Cross is also facilitating the discharge of patients from University Hospital Cork to care centres in West Cork.

JVCC
The Joint Voluntary Control Centre (JVCC) on Clyde Road, Dublin is moving to a 24-hour service for the weekend. This centre provides the HSE ambulance control with a single point of contact with the voluntary ambulance sector in Ireland.

Homelessness
The Irish Red Cross also supported homeless charities in Dublin, in particular Merchants Quay Ireland and Crosscare. Volunteers supported these organisations in delivery of services overnight and will be available to assist in Merchants Quay Ireland again tonight.

The Irish Red Cross is an auxiliary to state statutory services in times of national emergency. 

Yesterday, Irish Red Cross volunteers attended a recording-breaking 60 call-outs in the southern region. The Irish Red Cross has never dealt with this volume of calls - not alone in one region - but nationally - in one day before. 

The Irish Red Cross transferring medications between hospital.

Video footage of our volunteers working in the Joint Voluntary Command Centre (JVCC) is available upon request.

 

Top